Bhutan is a tiny and remote kingdom nestling in the Himalayas between its powerful neighbors, India and China. Almost completely cut off for centuries, it has tried to let in some aspects of the outside world while fiercely guarding its ancient traditions. The Bhutanese name for Bhutan, Druk Yul, means "Land of the Thunder Dragon" and it only began to open up to outsiders in the 1970s. The Wangchuck hereditary monarchy has wielded power since 1907. But Bhutan became a two-party parliamentary democracy after elections in March 2008.

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Bhutan has a rich and unique cultural heritage, that has been developed since the introduction of Buddhism in the 8th century. Festivals enhance this culture and are the best opportunities to witness how much Bhutan is deeply steeped into its heritage. During the festivals, you can observe mask dancers performed energetic dance dramas in colorful and stylized costumes.  The festivals preserve ancients folks, believes and religious customs by passing on the history and legends of the country. It also help perpetuating the ancient lore and art of mask-making.

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Bhutan is a small country, approximately the size of Switzerland, but it is home of a wealth of exceptional landscapes. From its natural splendors, gorgeous landscapes, stunning snow-capped mountains, green meadows with blossoming flowers and grazing yaks,  to its  rich and unique cultural heritage, magnificent monasteries and fortresses, temples and stupas,  monks dress in red robes; there are a lot to see, do and explore. Here is our handpick selections of sightseeing, activities and adventures.

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Autumn is the most popular time to visit Bhutan, and many travelers arrive for the big festivals during this season, pushing prices up. Smaller festivals at other times of year give you an authentic experience without the crowds and cost. The weather in spring is delightful and wildflowers blossom. Bhutan is least crowded in summer, as it is monsoon season. The monsoon weather is however not quite as bad as might be expected, so it is still worth visiting even though mountain views are harder to come by.

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There are only two airlines that fly into Paro which has a short runway and can only handle smaller Airbus 319s. The main flag carrier is Druk Airways, operating modern Airbus 319s and Tashi Air (also known as Bhutan Airlines) which also flies an Airbus 319. The main hub airports you can fly from are Mumbai, Delhi, Calcutta, Bangkok and Singapore. There are also flights from Bagdogra in India, Kathmandu in Nepal and Dhaka in Bangladesh, giving the opportunity to combine your trip with one of these country.

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To travel to Bhutan, you must book through an officially recognized tour operator, like us, and pay a minimum of $200 per person per day, but do note this includes your accommodation, transfers, meals and taxes. Generally when using the better hotels, transfers and guides, you always exceed that amount, but it doesn’t mean the visa cost is $250 a day, it actual fact it is $65 per person a day! All we need to arrange your visa is a scanned copy of your passport and we will send you the visa with your final documents.

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